Continuing with our discussion on workflow communication, the result of a request and a successful negotiation is a promise. The promise is a commitment, made by the fulfiller of the request to perform work. Wrapped into the promise are the Conditions of Satisfaction that were determined during the offer and negotiation phases.

Conditions of Satisfaction (COS) explicitly let both parties know what success looks like. Here’s an example of a promise and associated conditions of satisfaction.

“I agree to develop a website for you that conforms to the wireframes previously agreed upon, and uses your company’s current branding standards, colors, and logo. I will complete the work no later than August 15, 2017. In return for my work that meets the COS, you will pay me $5,000 on August 15, when the site goes live. You also agree to speak well of me in the marketplace.”

Let’s get back to the word “promise”. The word carries with it a seriousness of commitment . An understanding, that if the work (promise) is not fulfilled, the customer, client, co-worker, boss will be harmed in some way. Try it out when making a request. “When would you like to promise to have the work completed?”

More about promises and identity coming soon.